Analysis of the Effects of Modifying Agents on Six Different Phenotypes in Preneoplastic Foci in the Liver in Medium-Term Bioassay Model in Rats

  • Hiroyuki Tsuda
  • Satoshi Uwagawa
  • Toyohiko Aoki
  • Shoji Fukushima
  • Katsumi Imaida
  • Nobuyuki Ito
  • Kiyomi Sato
  • Toshikazu Nakamura
  • Franz Oesch

Abstract

Recently a great deal of interest has been expressed in characterizing the altered enzyme phenotype of putative preneoplastic rat liver lesions. In particular, attention has been given to the changes in drug metabolizing potential, conferring physiological advantage to initiated cells, and their usefulness as marker lesions for the analysis of the development of neoplasia1–2.

Keywords

Partial Hepatectomy Epoxide Hydrolase Butylate Hydroxyanisole Preneoplastic Lesion Conformity Class 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroyuki Tsuda
    • 1
  • Satoshi Uwagawa
    • 1
  • Toyohiko Aoki
    • 1
  • Shoji Fukushima
    • 1
  • Katsumi Imaida
    • 1
  • Nobuyuki Ito
    • 1
  • Kiyomi Sato
    • 2
  • Toshikazu Nakamura
    • 3
  • Franz Oesch
    • 4
  1. 1.First Department of PathologyNagoya City University Medical SchoolMizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467Japan
  2. 2.Second Department of BiochemistryHirosaki School of MedicineHirosaki 036Japan
  3. 3.Institute for Enzyme ResearchUniversity of Tokushima School of MedicineTokushima 770Japan
  4. 4.Institute of ToxicologyUniversity of MainzMainzGermany

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