DNA Fragmentation or Changes in Chromatin Conformation. Results with Two Model Systems: Promotion in Rat Liver Carcinogenesis and Proliferation in Mastocytes

  • Silvio Parodi
  • Maurizio Taningher
  • Patrizia Russo
  • Paolo Lusuriello
  • Michael Minks
  • Rossella Bordone
  • Franca Marchesini
  • Viviana Pisano
  • Cecilia Balbi

Abstract

We have recently observed that different promoting treatments in rat liver carcinogenesis induce an apparent DNA fragmentation, as monitored by the alkaline elution technique (DNA elution through calibrated pores of filters after lysis of nuclei with 2M NaCl) and sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients1,2. A summary of the results obtained with 1% orotic acid in the diet of rats for five weeks is shown in Table 1, and a summary of the results obtained with a choline deficient diet for five days is shown in Table 2. Birnboim has reported the induction of DNA fragmentation in leucocytes after treatment with TPA3.

Keywords

Basal Diet Orotic Acid Lithocholic Acid Chromatin Conformation Elution Rate 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Silvio Parodi
    • 1
  • Maurizio Taningher
    • 1
  • Patrizia Russo
    • 1
  • Paolo Lusuriello
    • 1
  • Michael Minks
    • 1
  • Rossella Bordone
    • 1
  • Franca Marchesini
    • 1
  • Viviana Pisano
    • 1
  • Cecilia Balbi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Experimental OncologyUniversity of Genoa/Centro Interuniversitario per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul CancroGenoaItaly

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