Comparison of the Covalent Binding of Various Chloroethanes with Nucleic Acids

  • Giorgio Prodi
  • Annamaria Colacci
  • Sandro Grilli
  • Giovanna Lattanzi
  • Mario Mazzullo
  • Paola Turina

Abstract

Chlorinated hydrocarbons are widely produced and utilized for various purposes (as solvents, chemical intermediates, fumigants, vapor-pressure depressants in aerosols, etc.)1–3.

Keywords

Cytosolic Fraction Covalent Binding Sister Chromatid Exchange Enzymatic Fraction Mixed Function Oxidase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giorgio Prodi
    • 1
  • Annamaria Colacci
    • 1
  • Sandro Grilli
    • 1
  • Giovanna Lattanzi
    • 1
  • Mario Mazzullo
    • 1
  • Paola Turina
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro Interuniversitario per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Istituto di CancerologiaUniversità di BolognaBolognaItaly

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