Stimulus Control in a Group Setting

  • Patricia Lacks
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Stimulus control treatment for insomnia, originally developed by Richard Bootzin (1977), was designed to be applied to individuals. We used a small-group method of delivering this intervention. We chose this group approach strictly to conserve scarce research funds. However, after treating both groups and individuals, we became convinced that the group approach was the superior method of delivering these services.

Keywords

Sleep Disturbance Sleep Disorder Stimulus Control Group Setting Sleep Hygiene 
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Reference

Recommended Readings

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Lacks
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentWashington UniversitySt. LouisUSA

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