Stimulus Control Instructions

  • Richard R. Bootzin
  • Dana Epstein
  • James M. Wood
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

The goals of stimulus control instructions are to help the insomniac learn to fall asleep quickly and to maintain sleep. These goals are reached by strengthening the bed as a cue for sleep, weakening it as a cue for activities that might interfere with sleep, and helping the insomniac acquire a consistent sleep rhythm. Although there are many causes of insomnia, poor sleep habits are often an important contributor.

Keywords

Sleep Problem Poor Sleep Garbage Collection Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Sleep Diary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

Recommended Readings

  1. Bootzin, R. R., & Engle-Friedman, M. (1987). Sleep disturbances. In L. Carstensen & B. Edelstein (Eds.), Handbook of clinical gerontology. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bootzin, R. R., & Nicassio, R (1978). Behavioral treatments for insomnia. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler, and P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 6 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  3. Lacks, P. (1987). Behavioral treatment for persistent insomnia. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders ( 3rd ed. ). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.Google Scholar
  2. Bootzin, R. R. (1972). A stimulus control treatment for insomnia. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association, 1972, 395–396.Google Scholar
  3. Bootzin, R. R. (1977). Effects of self-control procedures for insomnia. In R. B. Stuart (Ed.), Behavioral self-management: Strategies and outcomes. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  4. Bootzin, R. R., & Engle-Friedman, M. (1981). The assessment of insomnia. Behavioral Assessment, 3, 107–126.Google Scholar
  5. Bootzin, R. R., Engle-Friedman, M., & Hazlewood, L. (1983). Insomnia. In P. M. Lewinsohn & L. Teri (Eds.), Clinical geropsychology: New directions in assessment and treatment. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  6. Bootzin, R. R., & Nicassio, P. (1978). Behavioral treatments for insomnia. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler, and P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 6 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Borkovec, T. D. (1982). Insomnia. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 50, 880–895.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Espie, C. A., Lindsay, W. R., & Brooks, D. N. (1988). Substituting behavioural treatment for drugs in the treatment of insomnia: An exploratory study. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 19, 51–56.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Espie, C. A., Lindsay, W. R., Brooks, D. N., Hood, E. M., & Turvey, T. (1989). A controlled comparative investigation of psychological treatments for chronic sleep-onset insomnia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 27, 79–88.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Morin, C. M., & Azrin, H. N. (1987). Stimulus control and imagery training in treating sleep- maintenance insomnia. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55, 260–262.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard R. Bootzin
    • 1
  • Dana Epstein
    • 1
  • James M. Wood
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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