Constitutional, Renal, and Personality Factors as Contributors to Individual Differences in Reactivity

  • J. Rick Turner
Part of the The Springer Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology and Medicine book series (SSBP)

Abstract

In this chapter we shall take a somewhat different approach in examining the phenomenon of individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress. Up to now we have focused very much on the individual subject. Here we shall view that individual as a potential member of various groups. A number of specific constitutional factors have been shown to contribute to individual differences in reactivity in important ways (see Light, 1989); included in this list are age, ethnic or racial group, gender, and aerobic fitness. Unlike the first three factors, we can change our aerobic fitness level, and the relevance of doing so is therefore discussed (it is true that age also changes, but in a manner that is neither under voluntary control nor to the liking of most of us). Also in this chapter we shall look at renal and personality influences on reactivity.

Keywords

Menstrual Cycle Cardiovascular Response Aerobic Fitness Total Peripheral Resistance Cardiovascular Reactivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

Age

  1. 1.
    Alpert, B.S., and Wilson, D.K. (1992). Stress reactivity in childhood and adolescence. In J.R. Turner, A. Sherwood, and K.C. Light (Eds.), Individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress (pp. 187–201 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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Ethnic or Racial Differences

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    Anderson, N.B. (1989). Ethnic differences in resting and stress-induced cardiovascular and humoral activity: An overview. In N. Schneiderman, S.M. Weiss, and P.G. Kaufmann (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in cardiovascular behavioral medicine (pp. 433–451 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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    Anderson, N.B., McNeilly, M., and Myers, H. (1992). Toward understanding race difference in autonomic reactivity: A proposed contextual model. In J.R. Turner, A. Sherwood, and K.C. Light (Eds.), Individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress (pp. 125–143 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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    Light, K.C., and Sherwood, A. (1989). Race, borderline hypertension and hemodynamic responses to behavioral stress before and after beta-adrenergic blockade. Health Psychology, 8, 577–595.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Light, K.C., Turner, J.R., Hinderliter, A., and Sherwood, A. (1993). Race and gender comparisons: I. Hemodynamic responses to a series of stressors. Health Psychology, 12, 354–365. [This paper is also of relevance for the next section.]Google Scholar
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    Saab, P.G., Llabre, M.M., Hurwitz, B.E., Frame, C.A., Reineke, L.J., Fins, A.I., McCalla, J., Cieply, L.K., and Schneiderman, N. (1992). Myocardial and peripheral vascular responses to behavioral challenges and their stability in black and white Americans. Psychophysiology, 29, 384–397.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Gender Comparisons

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    Stoney, C.M. (1992). The role of reproductive hormones in cardiovascular and neuroendocrine function during behavioral stress. In J.R. Turner, A. Sherwood, and K.C. Light (Eds.), Individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress (pp. 147–163 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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Aerobic Fitness

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    Fillingim, R.B., and Blumenthal, J.A. (1992). Does aerobic fitness reduce stress responses? In J.R. Turner, A. Sherwood, and K.C. Light (Eds.), Individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress (pp. 203–217 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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Renal Factors

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    Light, K.C. (1992). Differential responses to salt-stress interactions: Relevance to hypertension. In J.R. Turner, A. Sherwood, and K.C. Light (Eds.), Individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress (pp. 245–263 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Light, K.C., and Turner, J.R. (1992). Stress-induced changes in the rate of sodium excretion in healthy black and white men. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 36, 497–508.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Personality Characteristics

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    Houston, B.K. (1992). Personality characteristics, reactivity, and cardiovascular disease. In J.R. Turner, A. Sherwood, and K.C. Light (Eds.), Individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress (pp. 103–123 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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    Smith, T.W., McGonigle, M., Turner, C.W., Ford, M.H., and Slattery, M.L. (1991). Cynical hostility in adult male twins. Psychosomatic Medicine, 53, 684–692.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Suarez, E.C., and Williams, R.B. (1989). Situational determinants of cardiovascular and emotional reactivity in high and low hostile men. Psychosomatic Medicine, 51, 404–418.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Ward, M.M., Chesney, M.A., Swan, G.E., Black, G.W., Parker, S.D., and Rosenman, R.H. (1986). Cardiovascular responses of type A and type B men to a series of stressors. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 9, 43–49.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Rick Turner
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TennesseeMemphisUSA

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