The Nervous, Endocrine, and Cardiovascular Systems

  • J. Rick Turner
Part of the The Springer Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology and Medicine book series (SSBP)

Abstract

Throughout this volume we are concerned with activity and reactivity in the cardiovascular system during psychological stressors. Cardiovascular activity is mediated by the nervous and endocrine systems. Accordingly, we shall now examine the necessary details of each system, and also look at how they interact to produce the cardiovascular responses that are the topic of this text. It should be acknowledged that some aspects of the organization of this chapter are based on that used by Rushmer (1989) in his description of the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, and the reader is referred to his work for further details.

Keywords

Cardiac Output Mean Arterial Pressure Autonomic Nervous System Sympathetic Nervous System Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. 1.
    Allen, M.T., Sherwood, A., & Obrist, P.A. (1986). Interactions of respiratory and cardiovascular adjustments to behavioral stressors. Psychophysiology, 23, 532–541.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Asterita, M.E (1985). The physiology of stress—with special reference to the neuroendocrine system. New York: Human Sciences Press.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Berne, R.M., & Levy, M.N. (1986). Cardiovascular physiology ( 5th ed. ). St. Louis: Mosby.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Falkner, B. (1989). Measurement of volume regulation: Renal function. In N. Schneiderman, S.M. Weiss, & P.G. Kaufmann (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in cardiovascular behavioral medicine (pp. 117–129 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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    Grossman, P. (1983). Respiration, stress, and cardiovascular function. Psychophysiology, 20, 284–300.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Guyton, A.C. (1989). Dominant role of the kidneys and accessory role of whole-body autoregulation in the pathogenesis of hypertension. American Journal of Hypertension, 2, 575–585.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mills, P.J., & Dimsdale, J.E. (1992). Sympathetic nervous system responses to psychosocial stressors. In J.R. Turner, A. Sherwood, & K.C. Light (Eds.), Individual differences in cardiovascular response to stress (pp. 33–49 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Rushmer, R.F. (1989). Structure and function of the cardiovascular system. In N. Schneiderman, S.M. Weiss, & P.G. Kaufmann (Eds.). Handbook of research methods in cardiovascular behavioral medicine (pp. 5–22 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
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    Selye, H. (1976). The stress of life (rev. ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
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    Ziegler, M.G. (1989). Catecholamine measurement in behavioral research. In N. Schneiderman, S.M. Weiss, & P.G. Kaufmann (Eds.). Handbook of research methods in cardiovascular behavioral medicine (pp. 167–183 ). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Rick Turner
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TennesseeMemphisUSA

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