Sodium Borocaptate and Boronopheynlalanine Alone or in Combination as Capture Agents for BNCT of the F98 Rat Glioma

  • Rolf F. Barth
  • Joan H. Rotaru
  • Alfred E. Staubus
  • Albert H. Soloway
  • Melvin L. Moeschberger

Abstract

Sodium borocaptate (Na2B12H11SH, designated as “BSH”) has been used clinically in Japan for over 25 years by Hatanaka et al. as a capture agent for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors.1 Independently, p — boronophenylalanine (BPA), which originally had been synthesized by Snyder2, has been used clinically by Mishima et al. as a capture agent for BNCT of cutaneous melanomas.3 The potential use of BPA as a capture agent for BNCT of primary and metastatic brain tumors has been evaluated in animal models by several groups, and evidence of therapeutic efficacy has been reported.4–7 It has been our view for many years that more effective delivery of boron to tumors could be achieved by using combinations of different delivery agents.8 A logical starting point for this approach would be to use BSH and BPA in combination with one another. The present report summarizes our data on the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and therapeutic efficacy of BSH and BPA in a rat brain tumor model system that we have used to study the efficacy of BSH9 and BPA6,7 independently of one another.

Keywords

Boron Concentration Boronic Acid Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Concentration Of20 Mean Survival Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rolf F. Barth
    • 1
  • Joan H. Rotaru
    • 1
  • Alfred E. Staubus
    • 2
  • Albert H. Soloway
    • 2
  • Melvin L. Moeschberger
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of PathologyUSA
  2. 2.College of PharmacyUSA
  3. 3.Division of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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