Antineoplastic Agents and Cancer Cell Differentiation

  • Alexander Bloch

Abstract

Because specific approaches for the inhibition or modulation of the cancer cell are lacking, therapies are used that adversely affect some normal cells as well as tumor cells. These treatments make use of highly cytotoxic antibiotics such as daunomycin and actinomycin D, and of cytotoxic antimetabolites such as methotrexate and araC. The agents are employed at maximally tolerated doses in order to remove the greatest possible number of tumor cells.

Keywords

Leukemia Cell Antineoplastic Agent Myeloid Leukemia Cell Tumor Cell Population Microbial Metabolite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Bloch
    • 1
  1. 1.Grace Cancer Drug CenterRoswell Park Memorial InstituteBuffaloUSA

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