Isolation Method for Recovery of Arcobacter butzleri from Fresh Poultry and Poultry Products

  • Anna M. Lammerding
  • Janet E. Harris
  • Hermy Lior
  • David E. Woodward
  • Linda Cole
  • C. Anne Muckle

Abstract

Arcobacter butzleri has been isolated from water and sewage samples, poultry and ground pork. Contaminated water and undercooked or improperly handled poultry or pork may contribute to human infections. Isolation of the organism from human or animal clinical specimens can be achieved by direct culture on solid media, often relying on a filtration step to reduce background microflora.1,8 However, recovery of specific microorganisms from food samples most often requires an enrichment step to generate populations high enough to detect on a solid medium. Since the aerotolerant A. butzleri has only recently been recognized as a potential human pathogen,4,9 there are no standard procedures currently available for the testing of foods for its presence. In order to determine the prevalence of A. butzleri in fresh poultry and other food samples, a method was needed to selectively cultivate the organism from amongst the diverse microflora naturally present on raw foods.

Keywords

Broiler Chicken Enrichment Broth Ground Pork Potential Human Pathogen Fresh Poultry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna M. Lammerding
    • 1
  • Janet E. Harris
    • 1
  • Hermy Lior
    • 2
  • David E. Woodward
    • 2
  • Linda Cole
    • 1
  • C. Anne Muckle
    • 1
  1. 1.Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Animal and Plant Health DirectorateHealth of Animals LaboratoryGuelphCanada
  2. 2.Laboratory Centre for Disease ControlHealth CanadaOttawaCanada

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