Special Functional Group Triglyceride Oil Based Interpenetrating Polymer Networks

  • L. H. Sperling
  • L. W. Barrett

Abstract

Castor oil, vernonia oil, and a few other triglyceride oils contain special functional groups, such as hydroxyl or epoxide, which can be polymerized to make soft elastomers with glass transitions as low as -50°C. These can be combined with either amorphous polymers, such as polystyrene, to make IPNs, or with poly (ethylene terephthalate) PET, a crystallizable polymer, to make semi-IPNs. The latter compositions were investigated, finding that the triglyceride oils can improve the crystallization rate of the PET, and castor oil and vernonia oil networks can also serve to rubber-toughen the PET.

Keywords

Ethylene Terephthalate Interpenetrate Polymer Network Sodium Benzoate Sebacic Acid Suberic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. H. Sperling
    • 1
  • L. W. Barrett
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Engineering Department Materials Science and Engineering Department Materials Research Center Center for Polymer Science and Engineering Whitaker Laboratory 5Lehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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