The Application of Photochemistry to Dental Materials

  • Robert J. Kilian
Chapter
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (POLS, volume 14)

Abstract

Within the last 10 years, photochemistry has begun to be used in the field of dental materials for the photocuring of methacrylate monomers. The current applications are the photocuring of 1) composite restoratives for the repair of anterior teeth, 2) liquid bonding agents to help bond these restoratives to the cavity preparations, 3) pit and fissure sealants for the sealing of enamel imperfections on the occlusal surfaces of molars, and 4) orthodontic bracket adhesives for the direct bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth.

Keywords

Composite Resin Dental Material Rockwell Hardness Cavity Preparation Fissure Sealant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Kilian
    • 1
  1. 1.Johnson & Johnson Dental Products CompanyEast WindsorUSA

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