Polythiosemicarbazides as Antimicrobial Polymers

  • James A. Brierley
  • L. Guy Donaruma
  • Steven Lockwood
  • Robert Mercogliano
  • Shinya Kitoh
  • Robert J. Warner
  • J. V. Depinto
  • J. K. Edzwald
Chapter
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (POLS, volume 14)

Abstract

Over a number of years, the antiparasitic and antibacterial properties of a large number of synthetic polymers have been examined by our research group. Among the materials examined were: sulfonamide-formaldehyde copolymers (1,2), sulfonamide-dimethylolurea copolymers (1,2), tropolone-formaldehyde copolymers (1,2), N-methacrylyl-l-aminoadamantane-methacrylic acid copolymers (1), and piperazine-dibasic acid copolymers (1). These materials have been tested against reasonably large numbers of parasite and bacterial species (1) in order to see if any structure-activity relationships could be observed. From this work it seemed that a number of potential structure-activity relationships could be noted (1). That is to say, observed activities apparently could be correlated with molecular weight, copolymer composition, and changes in substituents on the monomers from which the polymers were derived (1). Further, upon searching the literature, other polymer properties such as polyelectrolyte character, stereochemical configuration, crosslinking, etc. could be seen perhaps to exhibit trends toward being related to biological activities of various sorts (2). In addition, the molecular weight, copolymer composition, and substituent change presumed correlations which we observed in our own work also could be observed from independent results in the literature (2).

Keywords

Vinyl Chloride Positive Bacterium Vinyl Alcohol Succinic Anhydride Copolymer Composition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    L. G. Donaruma and O. Vogl eds., “Polymeric Drugs”, Academic Press, New York, NY, 1978, p. 349Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    L. G. Donaruma, “Progress in Polymer Science”, Vol. 4, Pergamon, Oxford, 1974, p. 1Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    L. G. Donaruma, S. Kitoh, G. Walsworth, J. V. Depinto, and J. K. Edzwald, Macromolecules, 12, 435 (1979)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. C. Cheng, “Molluscicides in Schistosomiasis Control”, Academic Press, New York, NY 1974Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    International Copper Research Association, Private communicationGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    R. L. Warner, ’’Synthesis of Some Novel Polymeric Thiosemicarbazides°’, Doctoral Thesis, Clarkson College of Technology, December 1978Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James A. Brierley
    • 1
  • L. Guy Donaruma
    • 1
  • Steven Lockwood
    • 1
  • Robert Mercogliano
    • 1
  • Shinya Kitoh
    • 2
  • Robert J. Warner
    • 3
  • J. V. Depinto
    • 4
  • J. K. Edzwald
    • 4
  1. 1.Departments of Biology and ChemistryNew Mexico Institute of Mining TechnologySocorroUSA
  2. 2.The Lion Co., Ltd., Odawara-ShiKanagawa-KenJapan
  3. 3.The Johnson Wax Co.RacineUSA
  4. 4.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringClarkson College of TechnologyPotsdamGermany

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