The Effect of Inflammatory Agents upon the Blood-Retinal Barrier

  • S. D. Bamforth
  • H. M. A. Towler
  • S. L. Lightman
  • J. Greenwood
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 46)

Summary

The blood-retinal barrier (BRB), like that of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), forms a selective interface between the blood and the neural parenchyma. During inflammatory diseases of the retina there is a large scale increase in leucocyte infiltration and breakdown of the BRB. It is not entirely clear, however, what the causative factors are in BRB disruption but cytokines, and other inflammatory agents, have been implicated. Here we will discuss the effects of the cytokines interleukin-1β (IL–lß), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL–6) and interleukin-2 (IL–2), arachidonic acid (AA) and the eicosanoids, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). and histamine, upon the rat BRB when administered intravitreally or intra-arterially.

Keywords

Intravitreal Injection Post Injection Retinal Vessel Inflammatory Agent Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Résumé

La barrière rétine-sang, comme celle du cerveau-sang, forme un interface sélectif entre le sang et le parenchyme neural. Durant les maladies inflammatoires de la rétine, il ya une forte augmentation de l’infiltration de leucocytes et une rupture de la barrière rétine-sang. Néanmoins, les facteurs qui provoquent la lésion de la barrière rétine-sang ne sont pas encore très clairs, mais des cytokines et des composants inflammatoires ont été impliqués. Ici, nous discuterons chez le rat des effets de cytokines comme l’interleukine-lβ (IL–lβ), le «tumour necrosis factor-a» (TNF-α), l’interleukine-6 (IL-6) et l’interleukine-2 (IL–2), l’acide arachidonique, les éicosanoides, le leukotriène B4 (LTB4) et la prostaglandine E2 (PGE2), et l’histamine, après injection dans l’humeur vitrée où injection intra-arterielle.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. D. Bamforth
    • 1
  • H. M. A. Towler
    • 1
  • S. L. Lightman
    • 1
  • J. Greenwood
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Ophthalmology Institute of OphthalmologyUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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