Migration and Fate of Transplanted Astrocytes

  • Claude M. Jacque
  • Isabelle Suard
  • Jerome Quinonero
  • Jean-Leon Tchelingerian
  • Nicole Baumann
  • John Booss
Part of the Altschul Symposia Series book series (ALSS, volume 2)

Abstract

During morphogenesis in the CNS extensive migration of cells occurs from the germinative zones toward the areas being formed (Boulder Committee, 1970). No one knows when it stops or even if it does stop. Migration becomes more and more limited during postnatal development in the brain. Telencephalic (Schmechel and Rakic, 1979; Benjelloun et al.,1984) and spinal cord (Hirano and Goldman, 1988) astrocytes form from radial glia. Although most astrocytes arise from radial glia some may well be generated directly from ventricular or sub-ventricular zones during late gliogenesis (Goldman and Vaysse, 1991). The pathways of migration used by the glial cells during normal morphogenesis have not been identified. However, it has been shown that migration along blood vessels would account for the distribution of the astrocytes in the retina (Ling and Stone, 1988). This is compatible with the observation that astrocytes are absent from avascular retinas (Stone and Dreher, 1987). The time and place at which divergent phenotypes are determined is unknown. Local factors might play major roles in establishing such characteristics as cell shape and antigenic specificity. Thus, the population of descendents of a single astrocyte progenitor in the ventricular zone may well be heterogeneous, depending upon the site of residence.

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Radial Glia Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Morphological Integration Host Brain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claude M. Jacque
    • 1
    • 2
  • Isabelle Suard
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jerome Quinonero
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jean-Leon Tchelingerian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nicole Baumann
    • 1
    • 2
  • John Booss
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.INSERM U-134Hopital de la SalpetriereParis cedex 13France
  2. 2.(JB) Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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