Liquid Crystalline Order in Collagen Networks

  • Françoise Gaill
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 263)

Abstract

Many tissues which are covering the surface of animals show fibrillar organizations which have been called twisted plywoods1 or helicoids2. This arrangement is similar to that of molecules in cholesteric liquid crystalline phases1, but the liquid character is often abolished by the presence of molecular crosslinks. Cholesteric and other liquid crystalline-like organizations are encountered in extracellular matrices composed of various components3 but we will only consider in this paper the case of the collagen networks.

Keywords

Collagen Fibril Liquid Crystalline Phases1 Collagen Network Hexagonal Packing Fibrillar Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Y. Bouligand, Twisted fibrous arrangement in biological materials and cholesteric mesophases, Tiss. Cell. 4: 189 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. C. Neville, A pipe cleaner molecular model for morphogenesis of plant cell walls based on hemicellulose complexity, J. theor. Biol. 243: 131 (1988).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Y. Bouligand, M. M. Giraud-Guille, Spatial organization of collagen fibrils in skeletal tissues: analogies with liquid crystals, in Biology of invertebrates and lower vertebrate collagens, A. Bairati and R. Garronne eds, Plenum Publishing Corporation, N. Y.(1985).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    L. W. Murray, M. L. Tanzer., The collagen of annelida, in Biology of invertebrates and lower vertebrate collagens, A. Bairati and R. Garronne eds, Plenum Publishing Corporation, N. Y. (1985).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    F. Gaill, Y. Bouligand, Long pitches helices, in Biology of invertebrates and lower vertebrate collagens, A. Bairati and R. Garronne eds, Plenum Publishing Corporation, N. Y. (1985)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    L. Lepescheux, Spatial organization of collagen cuticle in annelids: order and defects, Biol. Cell, 62: 17 (1988).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    F. Gaill, Y. Bouligand, Supercoil of collagen fibrils in the integument of Alvinella, an abyssal annelid, Tiss. Cell 19: 625 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    F. Gaill, D. Herbage, L. Lepescheux, Cuticle structure and composition of two hydrothermal vents invertebrates, Oceanol Act., 8: 155 (1988).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    F. Gaill, D. Herbage, L. Lepescheux, A three directional plywood of collagenous fibrils: the cuticle of Riftia Pachyptila, Matrix, in press.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    D. J. S. Hulmes, A. Miller, Quasi hexagonal packing in collagen fibrils, Nature, 282: 878 (1979).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    J. A. Chapman J. A., Molecular organization in the collagen fibril, in Connective tissue matrix, D. W. L. hukins ed., Verlag chemie, 1985.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    M. M. Giraud-Guille, Twisted Plywood Architecture of Collagen Fibrils in Human Compact Bone Osteons, Calcif. Tissue Int, 42: 167 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Y. Bouligand, J. P. Denèfle, J. P. Lechaire, M. Maillard, Twisted architecture in cell-free assembled collagen gels: study of collagen substrates used for cultures, Biol. Cell, 54: 143 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    M. M. Giraud-Guille, Liquid crystalline phases of sonicated type I collagen, Biol. Cell, 67, 97 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    F. Livolant, Y. Bouligand, Columnar textures presented by helical polymers, J. Phys. 47: 1813 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Françoise Gaill
    • 1
  1. 1.CNRS Biologie cellulaireIvryFrance

Personalised recommendations