Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor mRNA Levels in Different Tissues of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin-Responsive and Nonresponsive Mice

  • Olaf Döhr
  • Wei Li
  • Susanne Donat
  • Christoph Vogel
  • Josef Abel
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 387)

Summary

The AhR mRNA contents were measured in different tissues of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlo-rodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-responsive C57BL/6J and nonresponsive DBA/2J mice. Out of all examined tissues the highest AhR mRNA levels were found in lung, with concentrations of 31.7 ± 11.0 × 103 molecules / 100 ng RNA and 20.3 ± 8.9 × 103 molecules / 100 ng RNA in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, respectively. The AhR mRNA contents were 5–10 fold lower in heart, liver, thymus, brain and placenta. Low levels were found in spleen, kidney and muscle. Since no significant differences in AhR mRNA expression between the two strains were observed, factors other than regulation of AhR gene expression seem to be responsible for the observed different susceptibility toward TCDD.

Keywords

Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Concentration Of31 Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist Competitive Polymerase Chain Reaction Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Binding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olaf Döhr
    • 1
  • Wei Li
    • 1
  • Susanne Donat
    • 1
  • Christoph Vogel
    • 1
  • Josef Abel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ToxikologyMedical Institute of Environmental Hygiene at the Heinrich Heine UniversityDüsseldorfGermany

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