Role of Free Radicals in Failure of Fatty Livers following Liver Transplantation and Alcoholic Liver Injury

  • Ronald G. Thurman
  • Wenshi Gao
  • Henry D. Connor
  • Yukito Adachi
  • Robert F. Stachlewitz
  • Zhi Zhong
  • Kathryn T. Knecht
  • Blair U. Bradford
  • Ronald P. Mason
  • John J. Lemasters
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 387)

Abstract

A critical factor in the extreme shortage of livers for transplantation is frequent failure due to primary non-function of ethanol-induced fatty livers when employed as donor organs (Starzl et all., 1988). Although fatty livers due to ethanol are frequently available in the donor pool since a major source of liver grafts is brain-dead victims of accidents involving alcohol (Butts & Patetta, 1988), surgeons must sometimes discard these organs because of high lipid content. Thus, an examination of the relationship between alcohol, fatty liver, and graft failure following liver transplantation could lead to a larger donor pool of usable organs. With this as a goal, we examined the connection between Kupffer cells and reperfusion injury in ethanol-induced fatty liver since Kupffer cells, which are activated following cold storage and reperfusion (Thurman, Cowper, Marzi, Currin, & Lemasters, 1988), have been implicated in primary non-function. Kupffer cells, when activated, release toxic mediators including cytokines and eicosanoids (Decker, 1990) which may play a role in reperfusion injury following transplantation.

Keywords

Fatty Liver Reperfusion Injury Kupffer Cell Orthotopic Liver Transplantation Alcoholic Liver Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald G. Thurman
    • 1
  • Wenshi Gao
    • 1
  • Henry D. Connor
    • 1
  • Yukito Adachi
    • 1
  • Robert F. Stachlewitz
    • 1
  • Zhi Zhong
    • 1
  • Kathryn T. Knecht
    • 1
  • Blair U. Bradford
    • 1
  • Ronald P. Mason
    • 2
  • John J. Lemasters
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Hepatobiology and Toxicology Department of Pharmacology and Curriculum in Toxicology CB# 7365, FLOBThe University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Molecular BiophysicsNIEHS, NIH Research Triangle ParkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Cell Biology and AnatomyThe University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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