Induced Plant Resistance in Vascular-Wilt Biocontrol

  • R. J. Scheffer
  • B. A. M. Kroon
  • D. M. Elgersma
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 230)

Abstract

Vascular wilts are widespread and often disastrous plant diseases that begin as wilting, browning, and dying of leaves and shoots of plants followed by the final death of the plant. The name is derived from the one aspect vascular wilts have in common: disease symptoms are a result of the activities of the pathogen in the vascular tissues, namely the xylem, of the plant. True fungal vascular-wilt pathogens (in contrast to other wilt-inducing pathogens, such as members of Phoma, Deuterophoma and Rhizoctonia that cause stem and root rots and in some cases only vascular wilts) are found in few genera only: Fusarium, Verticillium, Cephalosporium, Phialophora, Verticicladiella and the closely related Ceratocystis and Ophiostoma.

Keywords

Biological Control Fusarium Oxysporum Fusarium Wilt Vascular Wilt Aggressive Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Scheffer
    • 2
    • 1
  • B. A. M. Kroon
    • 1
  • D. M. Elgersma
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Cell Biology Section of Plant PathologyUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Zaadunie B.V.EnkhuizenThe Netherlands

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