Biofeedback Applications in Rehabilitation Medicine: Implications for Performance in Sports

  • Steven L. Wolf

Abstract

Writings from contemporary literature (Ryder, 1976; Riegel, 1981; Seldon, 1982) strongly indicate that improvement in psychological milieu and physiological capabilities will enhance athletic performance. Indeed, computer processing of real-time physiological events (Hatze, 1981) and simulation models (Ramey & Tang, 1981) indicate that the human potential for achieving greater accuracy, speed, or fluidity of movement is accessible. The purposes of this chapter are to address ways in which biofeedback applications can restore function to the athlete following musculoskeletal injury and to speculate on ways in which performance can be enhanced. The approach is primarily physiological in nature; however, the psychological factors underlying optimal performance cannot be underestimated, and discussions governing a variety of techniques to reduce competitive stress and anxiety can be found elsewhere in this text.

Keywords

Physical Medicine Rehabilitation Medicine Biceps Brachii Auditory Feedback Musculoskeletal Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven L. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Rehabilitation MedicineEmory University, School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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