Biofeedback and Sports Science

  • Jack H. Sandweiss

Abstract

Although the notion of physiological self-regulation dates back centuries and is found throughout the Eastern literature (Suzuki, 1956), its value as a medical therapy is now only in its second decade. Biofeedback, as it has come to be called, is the only self-regulatory approach that has gained widespread acceptance in the medical community and is now practiced at most major hospitals and medical centers in the United States. There are several reasons for this occurrence. First, biofeedback evolved out of rigorously controlled scientific experimentation in experimental psychology and psychophysiology. Thus, there exists today a large and growing data base in traditional medical journals attesting to the efficacy of biofeedback when used with a wide variety of medical disorders. Second, within the medical milieu, biofeedback finds application in the treatment of disorders for which there is often no medical or surgical alternative. Furthermore, it is difficult to find any toxicity associated with biofeedback as a medical intervention, even if one searches (Gans, 1982). Finally, as a practical matter, biofeedback is very cost-effective when compared to the usual alternatives.

Keywords

Skin Conductance Sport Science Model Template Home Practice Peripheral Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack H. Sandweiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Sandweiss Biofeedback InstituteBeverly HillsUSA

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