Biodeterioration in Museums—Observations

  • Robert J. Koestler
  • Edward D. Santoro
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 3)

Abstract

The understanding and awareness of the occurrence and importance of microbiologically caused deterioration within a museum context vary considerably from institute to institute within the art conservation community. While understanding the nature and severity of a microbiological problem is difficult in itself, perhaps even more difficult is prescribing a safe and effective treatment for an object of artistic of cultural value. This introduction will review some of the issues art conservators face when confronted with a microbiological problem. Suggestions are made towards bridging the gap between conservation and research in the field; in addition, suggestions on directions for future research are included.

Keywords

Ethylene Oxide Methyl Bromide Conservation Institute Metropolitan Museum Conservation Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Koestler
    • 1
  • Edward D. Santoro
    • 2
  1. 1.Objects ConservationThe Metropolitan Museum of ArtNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.BrickUSA

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