Microbiological and Serological Studies of an Outbreak of “Humidifier Fever” in a Print Shop

  • Daniel M. Lewis
  • Jacek Dutkiewicz
  • William G. Sorenson
  • Margaret Mamolen
  • John E. Hall
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 3)

Abstract

The aerosolization of microorganisms can occur in a variety of environments, and in certain situations can induce pulmonary reactions in exposed persons. One example of this situation occurs in the operation of humidification systems. The pulmonary reaction is thought to result from the microbial contamination of the water used in the humidification system coupled with the dispersion of the contaminants by the air system being humdified. This aerosolization of microbes and their metabolites can cause disease by infection as is seen in “Legionnaire’s Disease” (Basich, et al 1980), by inducing an allergic and/or asthmatic reaction (Solomon, 1974), or by inducing an acute, febrile pulmonary reaction often referred to as “Humidifier Fever” (Parks, 1982).

Keywords

Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus Acute Febrile Illness Pulmonary Reaction Humidification System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Basich, J.E., Resnick, A. and Fink, J.N. (1980). Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis and Legionnaire’s Disease. Am. Rev. Resp. Dis., 121, 885–887.Google Scholar
  2. doPico, G.A. (1986). Health effects of organic dusts in the farm environment. Report on Diseases. Am. J. Ind. Med., 10, 261–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Edwards, J.H., Baker, J.T., and Davies, B.H. (1974). Precipitin test negative farmer’s lung: Activation of the alternative pathway of complement by mouldy hay dusts. Clin. Allergy, 4, 379–388.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Flaherty, D.K., Deck, F.H., Cooper, J., Bishop, K., Winzenburger, P.A., Smith, L.R., Bynum, L. and Witmer, W.B. (1984). Bacterial endotoxin isolated from a spray air humidification system as a putative agent of occupation-related lung disease. Infect. Immunity, 43, 206–212.Google Scholar
  5. Gordon, M.A., Almy, R.E., Greene, C.H. and Fenton, J.W. (1971). Diagnostic mycoserology by immunoelectroosmophoresis: A general, rapid, and sensitive microtechnique. Am. J. Clin. Pathol., 56, 471–474.Google Scholar
  6. Jones, A. (1982). Farmer’s Lung: An overview and prospectus. Ann. Am. Conf. Gov. Ind. Hyg., 2, 171–181.Google Scholar
  7. Nordman, H. (1984). Humidifier Syndrome. In: Occupational Lung Disease, Gee, J.B.L. and Morgan, W.K.C. eds. Raven Press, New York, pp 97–107.Google Scholar
  8. Olenchock, S.A., May, J.J., Pratt, D.S., Piacitelli, L. and Parker, J.E. (1989a). Presence of endotoxins in different agricultural environments. Am. J. Ind. Med., (in press).Google Scholar
  9. Olenchock, S.A., Sorenson, W.G., Mary, J.J. and Parker, J.E. (1989b). Microbial contamination and immunologic reactivity of stored oats. In: Biodeterioration Research III, Llewellyn, G.C. and O’Rear, C.E., eds. Plenum Publishing, New York (in press).Google Scholar
  10. Parks, W.R. (1982). Occupational Lung Disorders, Second Edition. pp. 384–385. Butterworths, London.Google Scholar
  11. Pratt, D.S. and May, J.J. (1984). Feed associated respiratory illness in farmers. Arch Environ. Health, 39, 43–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Rylander, R., Haglind, P., Lundholm, M., Mattsby, I. and Stenqrist, K. (1978). Humidifier fever and endotoxin exposure. Clin. Allergy, 8, 511–516.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Solomon, W.R. (1974). Fungus aerosols arising from cold-mist vaporizers. J. Allergy Clin. Immunol., 54, 222–228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Voller, A. and Bidwell, D. (1986). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In: Manual of Clinical Laboratory Immunology, Third Edition, Rose, N.R., Friedman, H. and Fahey, J.L., eds., American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C., pp 99–109.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel M. Lewis
    • 1
  • Jacek Dutkiewicz
    • 1
  • William G. Sorenson
    • 1
  • Margaret Mamolen
    • 2
  • John E. Hall
    • 3
  1. 1.Immunology Section, Division of Respiratory Disease StudiesNational Institute for Occupational Safety and HealthMorgantownUSA
  2. 2.Vermont State Health DepartmentBurlingtonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyWest Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA

Personalised recommendations