Biochemistry pp 117-140 | Cite as

Carbohydrates

  • J. Stenesh

Abstract

Carbohydrates, or saccharides (from the Greek, meaning “sugar”), are widespread in nature, especially in plants. More commonly known as sugars, they constitute, on the basis of mass, the most abundant class of biomolecules. More than half of all the organic carbon on Earth occurs in the form of two carbohydrates, starch and cellulose.

Keywords

Hyaluronic Acid Chondroitin Sulfate Amino Sugar Chiral Center Sugar Alcohol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Stenesh
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

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