Behavioral Priorities for Autism and Related Developmental Disorders

  • Eric Schopler
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

This chapter is based on our experience in developing North Carolina’s statewide program for the Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped CHildren (Division TEACCH). It is the only statewide program, mandated by state law to provide service, research, and multidisciplinary training in behalf of autism and related developmental disorders. As both the oldest and only comprehensive university program of this kind, it provides a unique source of clinical and research data to discuss the broader issue of behavioral treatment models.

Keywords

Autistic Child Childhood Autism Rate Scale Infantile Autism Individualize Teaching Program Harvard Educational Review 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Schopler
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCH, School of MedicineThe University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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