An Elementary Cognitive Assessment and Treatment of the Craniocerebrally Injured Patient

  • Theodore Najenson
  • Levy Rahmani
  • Betty Elazar
  • Sara Averbuch
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

This chapter aims to present the ongoing work of the Occupational Therapy (OT) Department at the Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital and has largely grown out of our practical work with the patients there. Certainly, we have been inspired by the rich literature dealing with these topics. Since other chapters in this volume have amply reviewed available testing procedures (see the chapter by W. J. Lynch), reference is made only to work directly related to this presentation. Furthermore, the work performed by the OT staff is an integral part of the interdisciplinary rehabilitative activity of this institution (Najenson, Mendelson, Schechler, David, Mintz, & Grosswasser, 1974; Najenson, Grosswasser, & Mendelson, 1980; Najenson, 1980). We thought to focus this paper on this fragment of our rehabilitative program.

Keywords

Occupational Therapy Clinical Neuropsychology Choice Object Intellectual Process Elementary Logical Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bruner, J. S. Beyond information given. New York: Norton, 1973.Google Scholar
  2. Bruner, J. S., & Potter, M. Interference in visual recognition. Science, 1964, 144, 424–425.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Christensen, A. L. Luria’s neuropsychological investigation. New York: Spectrum, 1975.Google Scholar
  4. Galperin, P. J. Stages in the development of mental acts. In M. Cole & J. Maltzman (Eds.), A handbook of contemporary Soviet psychology. New York: Basic Books, 1969.Google Scholar
  5. Golden, C. J. A standardized version of Luria’s neuropsychological tests: A quantitative and qualitative approach to neuropsychological evaluation. In S. B. Filskov & T. J. Boll (Eds.), Handbook of clinical neuropsychology. New York: Wiley, 1980.Google Scholar
  6. Halstead, W. C. Brain and intelligence: A quantitative study of the frontal lobes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1947.Google Scholar
  7. Luria, A. R. The working brain. London: Allen Lane. The Penguin Press, 1973.Google Scholar
  8. Najenson, T., Mendelson, L., Schechter, I., David, C., Mintz, N., & Groswasser, Z.: Rehabilitation after severe head injury. Scandinavian Journal Rehabilitation Medicine, 1974, 6, 5–14.Google Scholar
  9. Najenson, T., Groswasser, Z., & Mendelson, L. Rehabilitation outcome of brain damaged patients after severe head injury. International Rehabilitation Medicine, 1980, 2, 17–22.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Najenson, T. Rehabilitation of severely brain injured patients. Lecture at the 4th Annual Postgraduate Course on the Rehabilitation of the Traumatic Brain Injured Adult, Williamsburg, Virginia, 1980.Google Scholar
  11. Rahmani, L. Neuro-cognitive theory and the intellectual rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. Paper presented at the Workshop on Recovery from Brain Damage, Rotterdam, April 1981.Google Scholar
  12. Rahmani, L. The intellectual rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. Clinical Neuropsychology. In press.Google Scholar
  13. Reitan, R. N. Methodological problems in clinical neuropsychology. In R. N. Reitan & L. A. Davison (Eds.), Clinical neuropsychology: Current status and application. Washington, D.C.: Winston, 1974.Google Scholar
  14. Rosch, E. Principles of categorization. In E. Rosch & B. Lloyd (Eds.), Cognition and categorization. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum, 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore Najenson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Levy Rahmani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Betty Elazar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sara Averbuch
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Loewenstein Rehabilitation HospitalRa’ananaIsrael
  2. 2.Sackler School of MedicineUniversity of Tel AvivTel AvivIsrael

Personalised recommendations