School Reintegration

  • Patricia Blakeney
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Preparation for the pediatric burn patient to reenter society begins almost as soon as the child is admitted for acute care, intensifying as discharge becomes imminent. The specter of returning home and resuming life outside the hospital can be frightening for the pediatric burn survivor, especially if that injury renders the child visibly changed and different from other children in appearance and/or in mobility (Harrison, 1985; Knudson-Cooper, 1982; Luther & Price 1981). Children as young as 3 years old have been observed to attend to physical appearance as a factor in social acceptance (Barden, 1990; Langlois & Downs, 1979). Clinical observations indicate that preschool children, as well as older children and adolescents, who have been burned almost invariably express negative feelings on viewing their burn scars. Their verbal expressions of their own reactions to their changed appearances frequently include a reference to fear of rejection by others. “I look like a monster” is a frequent statement summing up the child’s predictions that other people will be rejecting or demeaning.

Keywords

Social Competence Social Acceptance Injured Child Physical Attractiveness School Personnel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Blakeney
    • 1
  1. 1.Shriners Burns InstituteGalvestonUSA

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