Body Images and Pediatric Burn Injury

  • Thomas Pruzinsky
  • Marion Doctor
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Body image is a critical variable in understanding children and adolescent’s adjustment to burn injury (Bernstein, 1976; Stoddard, 1982). The primary goal of this chapter is to provide a broad theoretical, clinical, and empirical overview of the influence of body-image factors in children and adolescents’ adjustment to burn injury. However, when considering body-image adjustment we must also consider the total socioemotional adjustment of the patient and family to the burn injury; including such critical variables as social support, child temperament, existence of psychopathology, and the family’s socioeconomic status (Bernstein, 1976, 1990; Tarnow-ski, Rasnake, Gavaghan-Jones, & Smith, 1991).

Keywords

Body Image Physical Appearance Social Skill Training Physical Competence Facial Deformity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Pruzinsky
    • 1
  • Marion Doctor
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyQuinnipiac CollegeHamdenUSA
  2. 2.Children’s Hospital Burn CenterUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA

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