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Alarm Pheromones of the Queen and Worker Honey Bees (Apis Mellifera L.)

  • Yaacov Lensky
  • Pierre Cassier

Abstract

Both queen and worker honey bees secrete specific alarm pheromones which trigger different behavioural patterns in each female caste.

Keywords

Mandibular Gland Alarm Pheromone Venom Gland Hive Entrance Observation Hive 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yaacov Lensky
    • 1
  • Pierre Cassier
    • 2
  1. 1.Triwaks Bee Research CenterHebrew University, Faculty of AgricultureRehovotIsrael
  2. 2.Laboratoire d Evolution des Etres organisesUniversite Pierre et Marie CurieParisFrance

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