Binocular Integration in the Visual Cortex

  • Peter Hammond

Abstract

Study of the monocular and binocular properties of neurones in the lightly anaesthetized feline striate cortex reveals a wealth of functional interactions which potentially underpin eye convergence and interocular alignment, and the encoding of visual perspective of three-dimensional objects. Monocularly, neurones’ relative preferences for opposing directions of motion, and selectivity for range of directions, are reliant upon the spatial-frequency content of perceived scenes. Each neurone’s directionality, spatial-frequency selectivity, eye preference and length selectivity, differs according to whether input is from contralateral or ipsilateral eyes, or binocular.

Keywords

Spatial Frequency Receptive Field Ocular Dominance Directional Tuning Interocular Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Hammond
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication and NeuroscienceKeele UniversityKeele, StaffordshireUK

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