Why Would Anyone Want to Intentionally Embarrass me?

  • William F. Sharkey
Part of the The Springer Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Welcome to the world of intentional embarrassment. During our lives, you and I have experienced a variety of embarrassing situations. Maybe we dropped a drink on someone. Maybe we tripped over that demon crack in the sidewalk. Maybe we unknowingly walked in on someone who was using the bathroom. Or, maybe we felt empathic embarrassment when our best friend, sibling, child performed poorly on stage. Each of the above situations were more than likely accidental occurrences. However, during our lives, we may have been the recipient of an intentional act performed to cause us embarrassment. At other times, we may have been the intentional embarrassor of a deserving, or not so deserving, individual as exemplified by self-proclaimed embarrassors below (from Sharkey, 1990a)

Keywords

Romantic Partner Negative Valence Defense Attorney Fellow Worker Social Appropriateness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • William F. Sharkey
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA

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