Simplified Tests for Fat Deterioration

  • Setsuro Matsushita
  • Tomomi Asakawa

Abstract

Fats and oils contained in foods undergo changes during storage which result in the production of unpleasant taste, odor, and of toxic substances. These changes are due to autoxidation of fat and occur in foods such as, (i) various fats, (ii) fried foods such as potato chips, fried noodles, and fried beans, (iii) foods with added fats such as rice crackers and cookies, (iv) emulsions (mayonnaise) and (v) processed fish and meat. Frying fat also undergoes changes due to long periods of heating.

Keywords

Test Paper Peroxide Value Potato Chip Potassium Iodide Oxidative Rancidity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Setsuro Matsushita
    • 1
  • Tomomi Asakawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Institute for Food ScienceKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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