A Review of the Stratified Charge Engine Concept

  • Duane Abata

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of stratified charge combustion engines and ties together recent advances with past achievements. A brief historical literature survey of the stratified charge engine concept is first presented. Selected stratified charge engine designs are then presented which represent the varied methods devised to achieve stratified charge combustion. Advantages and disadvantages of the stratified charge concept are then presented. Various topic areas pertinent to the subject are then discussed including hydrocarbon analysis, emissions, alternative fuel operation, modifications to conventional Diesel and rotary engines, and modeling of stratified charge combustion systems are also discussed. This overview summarizes with the current efforts underway to achieve successful stratification. This review is meant to augment existing reviews as well as focus on recent developments in the area.

Keywords

Diesel Engine Combustion Chamber Equivalence Ratio Fuel Economy Fuel Injection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Duane Abata
    • 1
  1. 1.Associate Dean College of EngineeringMichigan Technological UniversityHoughtonUSA

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