Infant Speech Perception

Environmental Contributions
  • Rebecca E. Eilers
  • D. Kimbrough Oller
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 10)

Abstract

The formal study of infant speech perception was inaugurated by Eimas, Siqueland, Jusczyk, and Vigorito (1971), who assumed a radical theoretical position in asserting that infant perceptual abilities with regard to speech are “linguistic” and “innate.” Since then, research on the speech perceptual capabilities of infants has expanded enormously, and a major controversy has developed around the nature—nurture question. In order to introduce the evidence feeding this controversy, as well as the conclusions based on this evidence, the following listing of key empirical results and interpretations is provided. The studies mentioned are representative of the field in general and illustrate the theoretical confusion that has characterized this domain.

Keywords

Acoustical Society Speech Perception Stop Consonant Syllable Type Phonetic Classification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca E. Eilers
    • 1
  • D. Kimbrough Oller
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics and Psychology University of MiamiMailman Center for Child DevelopmentMiamiUSA

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