From Assessment to Treatment

Linkage to Interventions with Children
  • G. Reid Lyon
  • Louisa Moats
  • Jane M. Flynn
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Within the past decade, child clinical neuropsychologists have been called upon increasingly to make relevant and informed recommendations for the treatment of both documented (i.e., traumatic head injury) and putative (i.e., learning disabilities) neurologically based developmental disorders. This increase in requests for specific therapeutic recommendations reflects a change in how the role of the child clinical neuropsychologist is perceived and, in particular, how the data obtained from neuropsychological assessments are used.

Keywords

Neuropsychological Assessment Reading Disability Dyslexic Child Oral Reading Percentile Rank 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Reid Lyon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Louisa Moats
    • 4
  • Jane M. Flynn
    • 5
  1. 1.Departments of Neurology and Communication Science and DisordersUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Gundersen Medical FoundationUSA
  3. 3.Department of Special EducationSt. Michael’s CollegeWinooskiUSA
  4. 4.Associates in Counseling and EducationEast ThetfordUSA
  5. 5.Gundersen Medical FoundationLaCrosseUSA

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