SAFEWORK: Software to Analyse and Design Workplaces

  • Robert Gilbert
  • Robert Carrier
  • Jean Schiettekatte
  • Christian Fortin
  • Bernard Dechamplain
  • H. N. Cheng
  • Alain Savard
  • Claude Benoit
  • Marc Lachapelle

Abstract

SAFEWORK is a software package that easily allows the analysis and design of a workplace as well as the various man-machine interfaces. The main objectives of SAFEWORK’s development are the following:
  1. a.

    function in an IBM AT (or similar) environment (possibly using a 80386 and coprocessor)

     
  2. b.

    have all the functions required to make it genuinely useful

     
  3. c.

    isolate the user from the complexity of its internal models

     
  4. d.

    be reliable, coherent and robust

     
  5. e.

    be easy to use, and

     
  6. f.

    avoid creating long periods of dead time during the execution.

     

Keywords

Internal Model Body Segment Body Volume Body Build Design Workplace 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Gilbert
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert Carrier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jean Schiettekatte
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christian Fortin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bernard Dechamplain
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. N. Cheng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alain Savard
    • 1
    • 2
  • Claude Benoit
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marc Lachapelle
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Industrial EngineeringEcole Polytechnique de MontréalMontréalCanada
  2. 2.Les Consultants Génicom IncorporatedMontréalCanada

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