Use of Biomechanical Static Strength Models in Workspace Design

  • Susan M. Evans

Abstract

Human anthropometric models have traditionally focused on the factors of human performance related to size, fit, clearance, or range of movement. An underlying structure in most of these models is a link system, similar to a skeleton, but concerned with functional, rather than anatomic joint centers, and used to position the human in space. Biomechanical models represent a logical extension of anthropometric models, adding segmental mass properties, load moments, and often muscle strength characteristics to assess operator performance over a wider range of static and dynamic conditions.

Keywords

Biomechanical Model Strength Model Strength Prediction Biomechanical Strength Task Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan M. Evans
    • 1
  1. 1.Vector Research, Inc.Ann ArborUSA

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