Composites for Cryogenics

  • Michael S. Kramer
Part of the Applications of Cryogenic Technology book series (APCT, volume 10)

Abstract

Composite materials have been used in cryogenic applications for many years. Typically, cryogenic composites consist of G-10 type fiberglass material which has limited mechanical and thermal properties. More advanced applications with stringent design requirements require material properties beyond the capability of generally used composites. Composites utilizing advanced materials and fabrication methods provide designs with properties unobtainable with G-10. This paper gives mechanical and thermal design data and comparisons of various composite materials for cryogenic use.

Keywords

Outer Tube Resin Content Support Post Unidirectional Composite Heat Leak 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M.B. Kasen, Mechanical Performance of Graphite Reinforced Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures, in: “ Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 28,” R.P. Reed and A.F. Clark, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1982), pgs. 165–177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    G. Hartwig, Reinforced Polymers At Low Temperatures, in: “ Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 28,” R.P. Reed and A.F. Clark, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1982), pgs. 183–186.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    S.S. Wang and E.S.-M Chim, Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials, in “ Advances In Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 28,” R.P. Reed and A.F. Clark, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1982), pg. 192.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    G. Hartwig and S. Knaak, “ Fiber-Epoxy Composites at Low Temperatures,” Cryogenics, 24: 639–647 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. Takeno et al., Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Advanced Composite Materials at Low Temperatures, in: “ Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol 32,” R.P. Reed and A.F. Clark, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1986), pgs. 217–224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    K. Dahlerup-Peterson, Test of Composite Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures: Facilities and Results, in “ Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 26,” A.F. Clark and R.P. Reed, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1980), pg 303.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    W. Weiss, Low Temperature Properties of Carbon Reinforced Epoxide Resins in: “ Non-metallic Materials and Composite at Low Temperatures 2,” Plenum Press, New York (1979), pg. 303.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    K.A. Philpot and R.E. Randolph, The Use of Graphite/Epoxy Composites in Aerospace Structures Subject to Low Temperatures, in: “ Non-metallic Materials and Composites at Low Temperatures 2,” Plenum Press, New York (1982), pgs. 314–319.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    G. Hartwig, “ Thermal Expansion of Fiber Composites,” Cryogenics, 28: 257 (1988).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    M. Kramer and T. Nicol, Composite Materials for SSC Dipole Magnet Cryostats, in: “ Composites in Manufacturing 9,” SME (1990), pg. EM–90–101–4.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    R.D. Kriz and L.L. Sparks, Performance of Alumina/Epoxy Thermal Isolation Straps, in: “ Advanced in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 34,” R.P. Reed and A.F. Clark, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1988), pgs. 107–114.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    M.B. Kasen et al., Mechanical, Electrical and Thermal Characterization of G11CR Glass-Cloth/Epoxy Laminates Between Temperature and 4 K, in: “ Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 26,” A.F. Clark and R.P. Reed, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1980), pgs. 237–241.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    H. Hacker et al., Epoxies for Low Temperature Application Technology, in “ Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 30,” A.F. Clark and R.P. Reed, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1984), pg. 54.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    F.W. Markley, J.A. Hoffman, D.P, Hoffman and D.P. Muniz, Cryogenic Properties of Basic Epoxy Resin Systems, in “ Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials, Vol. 32.” A.F. Clark and R.P. Reed, eds., Plenum Press, New York (1986), pg. 119.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    H.D. Neubert, “ SQ5N Program Input Data”, Hans D. Neubert and Assoc., Anaheim Hills, CA.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    D.J. Radcliffe and H.M. Rosenberg, “ The Thermal Conductivity of Glass-Fiber and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites From 2 to 80 K,” Cryogenics 22: 85 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael S. Kramer
    • 1
  1. 1.ACPT, Inc.Huntington BeachUSA

Personalised recommendations