Famciclovir: Efficacy in Zoster and Issues in the Assessment of Pain

  • Ronald J. Boon
  • David R. J. Griffin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 394)

Abstract

When acyclovir was introduced in the early 1980’s, we saw a remarkable change in the treatment of herpes virus infections such as genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, ocular HSV infections and varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections (chickenpox and shingles) in both the normal and immunocompromised host.1 The now widespread use of acyclovir is a reflection of its safety and tolerability, and clinical trial data has demonstrated its utility in the treatment of human disease. As a consequence, human suffering has been alleviated and, in some cases, mortality reduced (e.g., neonatal HSV infections and herpes simplex enciphalitis).2,3

Keywords

Herpes Zoster Acute Pain Antimicrob Agent Postherpetic Neuralgia Rash Onset 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald J. Boon
  • David R. J. Griffin

There are no affiliations available

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