Management of Genital Herpes

  • Gregory J. Mertz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 394)

Abstract

Appropriate management of genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections involves establishing the diagnosis; counselling regarding the source, natural history and risk of transmission of infection; and, in many cases, use of antiviral chemotherapy. This chapter will summarize recent advances in the laboratory diagnosis and treatment of genital herpes, including recent trials with investigational drugs. A review of the clinical presentation and natural history of genital herpes and recent progress in our understanding of the risk of sexual transmission of infection is beyond the scope of this chapter. Issues of asymptomatic shedding and risk of transmission are discussed in the chapter by Corey, this volume.

Keywords

Herpes Simplex Virus Type Genital Herpes Oral Acyclovir Recurrent Genital Herpes Intravenous Acyclovir 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory J. Mertz

There are no affiliations available

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