Sociocultural Issues in Soviet Psychological Research

  • James V. Wertsch
Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 10)

Abstract

This chapter by Professor L. A. Venger touches on most of the high points of Soviet developmental theory over the past seven decades. Given the richness of this tradition, his chapter is quite an accomplishment. Venger has managed to summarize a set of major ideas in such a way that readers are not short changed of anything; instead, they are encouraged to read more of the writings cited (several of which are now translated from Russian into other languages). Of particular importance in my opinion is the fact that Venger has gone into some detail on the contributions of psychologists such as Zaporozhets, Elkonin, Poddiakov, and Venger himself. These are authors whose names are familiar to Western audiences, but their work is not as well known as that of figures such as Vygotsky, Leontiev, and Luria. This lacuna in our knowledge is clearly our loss.

Keywords

Mental Functioning Sociocultural Context Proximal Development Zone Ofproximal Development Psychological Tool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • James V. Wertsch
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyClark UniversityWorcesterUSA

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