The Mutual Construction of Asymmetries

  • Ivana Marková
Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 10)

Abstract

The concept of bi-directional development is based on the fundamental idea that an organism and its relevant environment are interdependent and that in the process of their mutual interaction they both co-develop. However, the amount and the quality of the development of an organism and its environment is asymmetrically distributed. Valsiner views the concept of asymmetry as one of the basic issues in co-constructivist theory. He maintains that asymmetries are jointly constructed in the developmental process and raises questions about the nature of the co-construction which must, in some ways, integrate intra-psychological and socio-cultural processes. In this chapter I propose to do two things. First, I shall discuss the mutual construction of asymmetries in various developmental domains. Second, I shall address the question, raised by Valsiner, as to whether asymmetry is compatible with the notion of shared codes in communication.

Keywords

Ontogenetic Development Impaired Speech Developmental Domain Joint Construction Communicative Code 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivana Marková
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of StirlingStirlingScotland

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