Paradigm, Paraphrase, Paralogia, and Paralysis: All in the name of progress

  • Bernard Kaplan
Part of the Annals of Theoretical Psychology book series (AOTP, volume 10)

Abstract

In Philosophy in a new key Susanne Langer (1942, p. 1) stresses the point that the questions posed by any interlocutor constrain and circumscribe the range of acceptable or palatable answers. Those who pose certain questions characteristically take for granted many assumptions that are open to dispute, or presuppose the truth of claims that may be false or problematic. Before I directly confront the substance of the paper by Vonèche, I would like to commend him for his refusal to be suborned by the question-begging queries and assertions posed to him by the Editors of this volume.

Keywords

Scientific Revolution Theory Building Organismic Approach World Hypothesis German Ideology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard Kaplan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Institute for Developmental AnalysisClark University and Heinz WernerWorcesterUSA

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