Interactionism and Achievement Theory

  • Joel O. Raynor

Abstract

I have not found the contemporary person × situation (p × s) debate very enlightening and therefore am pleased with Hyland’s efforts to clarify the theoretical perspective from which one can view it. I had thought that the historical p × s controversy and its resolution in Lewin’s (1935, 1938, 1943) programmatic equation, B = f (P, E), where P represents characteristic(s) of the person and E the perceived environment, had long ago resolved the issue, that both person and perceived environment are needed as constructs to understand the determinants of behavior, and that the theoretical task for psychology involves the specification of what these variables are for a particular behavior and how they combine (interact) at a given point in time to determine that behavior (cf. Atkinson, 1964; Atkinson & Birch, 1978a; Raynor & Entin, 1982). Lewin (1943) and Hull (1943) were both concerned with the proper role of the environment as a determinant of action in psychological theory. My thinking has been that the Hullians had won major battles, but the Lewinians had won the war.

Keywords

Conceptual Analysis Psychological Theory Person Variable Behavioral Analysis Future Orientation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel O. Raynor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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