Angiogenesis pp 209-217 | Cite as

Endothelial Cell Stimulating Angiogenesis Factor in Relation to Disease Processes

  • Jacqueline B. Weiss
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 263)

Abstract

In this chapter I will describe work which has been carried out with many collaborators some of which is published and some of which is not yet published. I have made reference to these co-workers at the appropriate parts of the chapter.

Keywords

Growth Plate Pineal Gland Tibial Fracture Microvessel Endothelial Cell Aortic Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Blash, D.E., 1984, The pineal gland: an oncostatic gland? in: “The Pineal Gland,” R.J. Reiter ed., Raven Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Brown, R.A., Tomlinson, I.W., Hill, C.R., and Weiss, J.B., 1983, Relationship of angiogenesis factor in synovial fluid to various joint diseases, Ann. Rheum. Dis. 42: 301.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brown, R.A., Taylor, C., McLaughlin, B., McFarland, C.D., Weiss, J.B., and Ali, S.Y., 1987, Epiphyseal growth plate cartilage and chondrocytes in mineralising culture produce a low molecular mass angiogenic procollagenase activator, Bone Miner. 3 (2): 143.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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  9. Taylor, C.M., and Weiss, J.B., 1989, Raised endothelial cell stimulating angiogenesis factor in diabetic retinopathy, Lancet 2 (8675): 1329PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline B. Weiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Wolfson Angiogenesis Unit University of Manchester Rheumatic Diseases CentreHope HospitalManchesterEngland

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