The Several Roles for Oxygen in Wound Angiogenesis

  • Jeffrey J. Gibson
  • Thomas K. Hunt
  • John J. Feng
  • Mark D. Rollins
  • Ahmad Y. Sheikh
  • M. Zamirul Hussain
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 298)

Abstract

Healing wounds provide a unique opportunity to study angiogenesis. Ever since the development of multicellular organisms necessitated the development of a circulatory system, injury has been a common feature of life. In all likelihood repair and replacement of injured vessels occured simultaneously with the original processes by which blood vessels developed in evolution. It is difficult even to imagine that reparative angiogenesis differs in any material way from that which occurs in normal growth and development; or, for that matter, from angiogenesis in many tumors. Wound angiogenesis is also extremely rapid and is unencumbered by the irrelevant, often distracting properties of tumors. Furthermore, wound healing presents a unique and liberating methodological opportunity because the artifact of the measurement, the wound, is the object of the exercise. Finally, the wound environment is easily measured and duplicated and intercellular messengers are easily sampled. With respect to oxygen, for instance, wounds are hypoxic and hyperlactated by nature1,2. This was found simply by aspirating and measuring the fluid which ordinarily collects in wounds2. Furthermore, oxygen tension, lactate levels and numerous other characteristics are easily influenced and measured experimentally.

Keywords

Collagen Synthesis Prolyl Hydroxylase Collagen Peptide High Oxygen Tension Intercellular Messenger 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey J. Gibson
    • 1
  • Thomas K. Hunt
    • 1
  • John J. Feng
    • 1
  • Mark D. Rollins
    • 1
  • Ahmad Y. Sheikh
    • 1
  • M. Zamirul Hussain
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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