Education and Research

  • Milton Greenblatt
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

In a field that is extraordinarily complicated and at the same time desperately lacking in critical research (not only on administration per se, but also on the training of administrators), what are the fundamental questions related to the training of administrators—and where do we stand on these questions today?

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Hospital Harvard Business Review Chief Resident Community Psychiatry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milton Greenblatt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Olive View Medical Center — Los Angeles CountySylmarUSA
  2. 2.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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