Internal Dynamics: Stresses and Strains

  • Milton Greenblatt
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

In any human system, stresses can arise—among individuals, between the individual and the group, among groups, and between the organization and outside agencies and institutions. These stresses may be mild, moderate, or acute. They may lead to temporary dysfunctions in relation to the goals of the enterprise, or they may lead to major disruptions, even breakdowns. Administrators, in their natural role as social system clinicians, become sensitive to these stresses, striving to diminish them and to ameliorate their negative impact upon the functioning of the organization. The health and welfare of systems depends on early diagnosis, prompt and effective intervention, and efforts to prevent recurrences.

Keywords

Internal Dynamics Mental Hospital Therapeutic Community Psychiatric Ward Mental Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milton Greenblatt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Olive View Medical Center — Los Angeles CountySylmarUSA
  2. 2.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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