Toward Better Theory and Practice

  • Milton Greenblatt
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

In discussing the origins of general system theory, Ludwig von Bertalanffy1 stated in 1956, “Today, our main problem is that of organized complexity.... General Systems Theory is in principle capable of giving exact definitions for such concepts and, in suitable cases, of putting them to quantitative analysis.” Similar thoughts about “organized complexities” inspired the writings of Mary Parker Follett,2 who in the 1930s examined complex industrial systems not merely to enlighten how they pursued the two objectives of producing commodities valued by the public and maximizing profits, but also because of her larger concern that unless organizations learn how to operate effectively in serving the individual, we are on the road to chaos. Her idea was that although the individual’s welfare is greatly dependent on the ability of business organizations to solve the problems of producing goods and services, clearly it is also dependent on governmental organizations to maintain equality among people in rights and privileges, as well as to provide protection and safety for them. In addition to the business organizations she studied, organizations and institutions dedicated to law, education, and justice, as well as health and welfare, are also vital to the safety and welfare of the individual citizen.

Keywords

Mental Hospital General System Theory Institutional Goal Organizational Creativity Social System Clinician 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bertalanffy LV: General systems theory. General Systems I:1–10, 1956. Reprinted from Main Currents in Modern Thought 71: 75, 1955Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Metcalf HC, Urwick L (eds): Dynamic Administration: The Collected Papers of Mary Parker Follett. New York, Harper & Bros., 1942Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kets de Vries MFR (ed): The Irrational Executive: Psychoanalytic Explorations in Management. New York, International Universities Press, 1984Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Greenblatt M: The psychiatrist as social system clinician, in Greenblatt M, Levinson DJ, Williams RH (eds): The Patient and the Mental Hospital. Glencoe, Illinois, Free Press, 1957, pp 317–326Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Virtanen R: Claude Bernard and His Place in the History of Ideas. Lincoln, Nebraska, University of Nebraska Press, 1960Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Miller JG: Living Systems. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1978. See Chapter 10, The Organization, pp 595–745Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Virtanen R: Claude Bernard and His Place in the History of Ideas. Lincoln, Nebraska, University of Nebraska Press, 1960.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Levinson H, with Molinare J, Spohn AG: Organizational Diagnosis. Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1972Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kets de Vries MFR (ed): The Irrational Executive: Psychoanalytic Explorations in Management. New York, International Universities Press, 1984.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Weber M (translated and edited by Henderson AM, Parsons T): The Theory of Social and Economic Organisation. New York, Free Press, 1947Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Barnard CI: The Functions of the Executive. Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1938Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Miller EJ, Rice AK: Systems of Organization. The Control of Tasks and Sentient Boundaries. London, Tavistock, 1967Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Sayre WS: Principles of administration-1. Hospitals 30: 34–35, 92, 1956Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hodgson, RC, Levinson DJ, Zaleznik A: The Executive Role Constellation. Cambridge, Harvard University, Division of Research, Graduate School of Business Administration, 1965Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Greenblatt M, Sharaf MR, Stone EM: Within the institution, Chapter 1 in Greenblatt M, Sharaf MR, Stone EM, Dynamics of Institutional Change. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh Press, 1971, pp 3–22Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Hson DE: Management by Objective. Palo Alto, California, Pacific Books, 1968Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Greenblatt M, York RH, Brown EL. From Custodial to Therapeutic Patient Care in Mental Hospitals. New York, Russell Sage Foundation, 1955, pp 155–156Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Greenblatt M, Sharaf MR, Stone EM: Within the institution, Chapter 1 in Greenblatt M, Sharaf MR, Stone EM, Dynamics of Institutional Change. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh Press, 1971, p 3Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Greenblatt M, Sharaf MR, Stone EM: Decentralization through unitization, Chapter 4 in Greenblatt M, Sharaf MR, Stone EM, Dynamics of Institutional Change. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh Press, 1971, pp 62–85Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Garcia LB: The Clarinda plan: An ecological approach to hospital organization. Ment Hosp 11: 30–31, 1960PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Bonn E, Kraft A: The Fort Logan mental health center: Genesis and development. J Fort Logan Ment Health Center 1: 17–27, 1963Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Jackson GW, Smith FV: A proposal for mental hospital organization: The Kansas plan. Ment Hosp 12; 5–8, 1967Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Emerson RW: Self-reliance, in Emerson RW: Essays and English Traits. New York, PF Collier & Son, 1909Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milton Greenblatt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Olive View Medical Center — Los Angeles CountySylmarUSA
  2. 2.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations