Microglia Secrete Plasminogen Which Enhances the Maturation of Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons in Vitro

  • Kazuyuki Nakajima
  • Koichi Nagata
  • Makoto Hamanoue
  • Nagisa Takemoto
  • Shuichi Koizumi
  • Kazuhide Inoue
  • Shinichi Kohsaka
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

In recent years, it has been generally accepted that survival, growth and function of neurons are regulated by neuron-glia interactions which are mediated through a variety of active substances such as neurotrophic factors, cytokines and other proteins. We recently found that a conditioned medium of cultured microglia showed neurotrophic activity for neocortical1 and mesencephalic2 neurons, suggesting that microglia secrete certain neurotrophic factor(s). During a survey of the factor(s) from microglia, certain proteases were found to be produced. Thus far elastase3, uPA4 and plasminogen (PGn)56 have been identified. Surprisingly, among these proteases, PGn showed neurotrophic activity such as promotion of neurite outgrowth7 and enhancement of survival and/or maturation of dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, pharmacological study using 1251-PGn revealed that PGn specifically binds to neocortical neurons. These results strongly suggest that microglia-secretory PGn binds to specific receptor molecule(s) on the neuronal surface and elicits neuronal responses.

Keywords

Tyrosine Hydroxylase Hank Balance Salt Solution Dopamine Uptake Glutamate NMDA Receptor Neurotrophic Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuyuki Nakajima
    • 1
  • Koichi Nagata
    • 1
  • Makoto Hamanoue
    • 1
  • Nagisa Takemoto
    • 1
  • Shuichi Koizumi
    • 2
  • Kazuhide Inoue
    • 2
  • Shinichi Kohsaka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurochemistryNational Institute of NeuroscienceKodaira, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologyNational Institute of Health SciencesSetagaya, TokyoJapan

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